Oct 182018

List of Criteria

Evaluation criteria should be informed by the list of assets which is already in place. One key characteristic of the list of criteria is the requirement should be written so that the evaluation results in either “yes” or “no”. Criteria should include buildability, reliability, and maintainability in case anything goes awry. Design concepts should also be evaluated based on buildability, technical feasibility, and functional feasibility. At this point in the design process, our team can write informatively on the technical and functional feasibility, and we can speculate on the buildability of design concepts. Furthermore, the list of evaluation criteria should be developed from customer requirements and cover all aspects of the device. The table containing the criterion should also be divided by demands and wishes when appropriate. When constructing a list of evaluation criteria, it is helpful to look at the requirements list and make sure the evaluation criteria includes anything pertinent from the requirements list.

When brainstorming evaluation criteria for a design, it is important to keep in mind that the evaluation criteria will be used in the Go/No Go analysis and choose appropriate criteria for that purpose. The criteria should be focused on the available assets and buildability. For junior engineers and professional engineers alike, a list of evaluation criteria is necessary to determine exactly what is required of a design, but also which requirements are the most important and which can be compromised on in order to produce a product which is fully functional and able to satisfy customer needs.

Table 1: List of Criteria: Description and Justification
Number Criterion Name Criterion Description Threshold for ‘Go’
Demands
1 Parts are buildable The unit must be able to be constructed with the assets available to the team members. Can the parts be built with the skills and resources we possess?
2 Autonomous The unit must meet the project’s basic requirement of autonomy. Can it operate without user input?
3 Parts Available  Parts must exist and be purchasable to complete a prototype. Are they purchasable?
4 Fits in course The unit must fit within the course walls to operate. < 2ft x 2ft
5 Navigates Course The unit must be able to navigate the course to meet the project’s minimum lap requirement. Can it move through the course?
6 Build Time The unit must be buildable within the time available to the group members. < 30 hours
7 Number of laps The total number of completed laps must meet the project’s minimum requirement. ≥ 2 laps
8 Reliable The unit must function properly to a standard acceptable to the customers on planet Gleesong. Does it fail less than it succeeds?
9 Components have complementary function Parts should support each other’s functions and not add unnecessary complication or energy loss. Do the components work together as an assembly?
10 Cost The total expenditure must fall within the project’s budget requirements. ≤ $100
Wishes
11 Stores Wind Energy Efficiently The unit should be able to store a maximum amount of energy without unnecessary waste. Does it store more than 30% of the energy in the wind?
12 Standardized Parts Parts should be easily swappable and readily available to reduce repair and assembly time. Can the parts be easily swapped without much thought?
13 Weight The unit should be as light as possible to increase efficiency and maximize payload. Does it weigh more than 5kg?
14 Payload The unit should be able to carry a payload to maximize the points gained. Can it carry a load without failing to complete 2 laps?

Description and Justification

The first demand criterion is that the robot must cost $100 or less. This is due to the project budget. It is imperative because if the robot exceeds the budget, it will not be able to compete. The next criterion is that the parts must exist and be purchasable to complete a prototype. If the parts are not purchasable, either because of budget constraints or location etc., the prototype will not be able to be built, resulting in failure. The next demand is the total number of completed laps must meet the project’s minimum requirement. The project’s minimum requirement is 2 laps; if the robot is unable to complete the minimum lap requirement, considerable points will be deducted, because the design will not meet the requirements. Next, the unit must fit within the course walls to operate. This is self-explanatory; if the vehicle does not fit within the bounds of the track it will not be able to complete the minimum number of laps and will fail.

The next demand we are evaluating our design concepts against is the unit must be buildable within the time available to the group members. If the unit cannot be built before the deadline, then all the design and planning has been wasted. Further, the unit must meet the project’s basic requirement of autonomy. Our team is allowed to activate the device, but it must collect and store the wind energy in another form autonomously, as well as drive and determine when and to what degree it should turn. The unit must also function properly to a standard acceptable to the customers on planet Gleesong. In other words, the vehicle must be reliable to an acceptable standard; it should succeed more often than it fails/breaks. Moreover, the unit must be able to be constructed with the assets available to the team members. This is very important, again if the team does not have the knowledge, tools or access to complete the unit, then the planning and design has not been effective. Components must also have complementary function, and not introduce any unnecessary complications or energy loss. And lastly, the unit must be able to navigate the track. If the vehicle is unable to navigate the track it will not meet the minimum lap requirement.

Our team also has four wishes we are choosing to require of our final design concepts. First, the parts should be standardized to benefit our team. The parts should be readily available and easy to swap, since prototypes often break. Next, the design concept should be light-weight, to allow for more efficiency. More efficiency means more laps can be completed, improving the overall result of the prototype. Similarly, the next wish is to be able to carry a payload. The lighter the design, the more payload it can carry, which improves the function of the design. Lastly, the design should have a reasonable efficiency; we have chosen 30% efficiency to be the minimum standard that our primary design concept should have.

Pranav Mohan

Change and progress are two words that define my character and my ultimate goals. I have a vision to bring a global change by targeting the psychology, because that is the easiest to change. My aim is to incur a self-progressive routine for myself and then help the people around me to progress themselves. In my perspective, walking towards a defined target should be everyone’s goal while keeping in mind that things don’t go as planned but still the target should remain unchanged.


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