Oct 202018

Below in Table 1 is Team Breaking Wind’s Go/No Go analysis of each of our six design concept systems. The evaluation criteria from the previous section make up the left-hand column, and the following columns detail whether the design system meets the requirement or not. If the requirement is met, the cell is highlighted green with the word “Go”, however if the system does not meet the requirement the cell is highlighted red with the words “No Go”. A Go/No Go matrix is a methodic procedure to determine which design concepts are likely to be the most effective solution to the problem statement based on the evaluation criteria, which of course includes buildability, technical feasibility, and functional feasibility. The Go/No Go analysis will also be used in Assignment 4 to write a refined concept description for the primary design concept.

A Go/No Go matrix is useful to students and professional engineers alike in order to definitively nail down criteria to measure a design against. It is important to have a methodical approach to accomplish this, otherwise it is likely that a design will not meet one or more criteria but will not be dismissed due to error. In the event that a design is not dismissed at this point which should have been, time will be wasted, which wastes company money and time the engineers/junior engineers could have spent improving designs that are viable.

Table 1: Go/No Go Analysis
Demands System 1 System 2 System 3 System 4 System 5 System 6
Parts Buildable Go Go Go Go Go No-Go
Autonomous Go Go Go Go Go Go
Parts Available Go No-Go Go Go Go No-Go
Fits in Course Go Go Go Go Go Go
Navigates Course Go Go Go Go Go No-Go
Build Time Go Go Go Go Go Go
Number of Laps Go No-Go Go Go No-Go No-Go
Reliable Go Go Go No-Go No-Go No-Go
Components Have Complementary Function Go Go Go Go Go Go
Cost Go No-Go Go Go Go No-Go
Wishes System 1 System 2 System 3 System 4 System 5 System 6
Stores Wind Energy Efficiently Go Go Go Go No-Go No-Go
Standardized Parts Go Go Go Go Go Go
Weight Go Go Go Go Go No-Go
Payload Go No-Go Go No-Go Go No-Go

 

The demands and wishes of the Go/No Go matrix are organized such that the most important criteria are listed towards the top and then go down in descending order of importance.  “Parts Buildable” is at the top of the demand list, as the device needs to be buildable with the skills and resources available to us in order to exist.  If it is not, the project fails.  Similarly, if the device cannot operate autonomously, we also fail.  However, it needs to be buildable before this can be a factor.  The parts needed to construct the apparatus also need to be available to us, such that it can be assembled.  If they are not available, others may have to be used in their place or we fail the project.  The vehicle also must fit within the course, or the course cannot be entered to be navigated.  The device must navigate the course successfully before it can complete 2 laps as well.  Once the minimums have been accomplished, the device needs to be reliable for our customers on planet Gleesong.  Further, the components need to work in harmony such that the apparatus works effectively.  Lastly, cost needs to be considered as we have a budget.  However, this criterium would not dictate failure.

The wishes list is arranged in the same manner as the demands section.  “Store Wind Energy Efficiently” is at the top of the list, as this dictates how much energy can be stored in the device.  If inefficient, the device would not be able to move a decent number of laps, or at worst case, not be able to complete the 2-lap minimum.  Standardizing parts would be useful, as this would decrease assembly, disassembly, and repair time, meaning that more time can be spent on the actual construction and testing of the device.  Weight of the vehicle is important, as it plays into the overall efficiency of the system.  The less it weighs, the farther it can go.  Also, if it weighs less, a greater payload can be carried, and thus more points can be gathered.

assembling the robot.

Parts Buildable

  • System 1: This system uses off-the-shelf parts, meaning only the joining parts need to be fabricated.  We have access to the tools, material, and skills necessary to construct these pieces, and thus, this system should be buildable.
  • System 2: This system also uses off-the-shelf parts, meaning only the joining parts need to be fabricated.  We have access to the tools, material (though, the capacitor would probably be underqualified for the job required), and skills necessary to construct these pieces, and thus, this system should be buildable.
  • System 3: This system also uses off-the-shelf parts, meaning only the joining parts need to be fabricated.  We have access to the tools, material, and skills necessary to construct these pieces, and thus, this system should be buildable.
  • System 4: This system uses off-the-shelf parts, meaning only the joining parts and pulley systems need to be fabricated.  We have access to the tools, material, and skills necessary to construct these pieces, and thus, this system should be buildable.
  • System 5: This system would need to be constructed entirely by us, however the simplicity of the system means that the tools, material, and skills we have access to are adequate for this purpose, and thus this system should be buildable
  • System 6: This system, would more than likely be unbuildable due to the shear amount of trial-and-error necessary to get the system working properly, as well as the inability to find parts, like the engine, that would accomplish what is required without extensive fabrication.

Autonomous

  • System 1: This system navigates the course using a microcontroller, without input from us, and is thus autonomous.
  • System 2: This system navigates the course using a microcontroller, without input from us, and is thus autonomous.
  • System 3: This system navigates the course using a microcontroller, without input from us, and is thus autonomous.
  • System 4: This system navigates the course using a microcontroller, without input from us, and is thus autonomous.
  • System 5: This system navigates the course using a wall following lever, not requiring external input, and is thus autonomous.
  • System 6: This system navigates the course using random binary selection, which does not require external input, and is thus autonomous.

Parts Available

  • System 1: All parts are easily available through such resources as Amazon or eBay.
  • System 2: All parts, except the capacitor, are easily available through such resources as Amazon or eBay.  The capacitor, which needs to have a large storage capacity, be small, cheap, and lightweight, is very difficult to find and may not be available.
  • System 3: Similar to system 1, all parts are easily available through such resources as Amazon or eBay.
  • System 4: This system also one where all parts are easily available through such resources as Amazon or eBay.
  • System 5: This system could be made entirely out of wood or metal parts.  Thus, materials would be easy to find, and the parts would just need to be manufactured.
  • System 6: This system is extremely difficult to find parts for, as it needs a compressor, engine, and pressure vessel of a small size, light weight, and low cost.

Fits in Course

  • System 1: This system would fit in the course, as the parts required are not large.
  • System 2: While the capacitor, the largest part of the system, could be sizeable, it would still not be large enough to keep it from fitting in the course.
  • System 3: This system would fit in the course, as the parts required are not large.
  • System 4: This system would fit in the course, as the parts required are not large.
  • System 5: This system would be able to fit within the course, as large parts are not required for this system to operate properly.
  • System 6: This system would be able to fit within the course, as the operation of this system requires the various components to be small.

Navigates Course

  • System 1: This system should navigate the course without much effort, as the system uses a microcontroller to determine the necessary movement patterns based off wall distance data from a sonar sensor.
  • System 2: This system should navigate the course without much effort, as the system uses a microcontroller to determine the necessary movement patterns based off wall distance data from an infrared sensor.
  • System 3: This system should navigate the course without much effort, as the system uses a microcontroller to determine the necessary movement patterns based off wall distance data from an infrared sensor.
  • System 4: This system should navigate the course without much effort, as the system also uses a microcontroller to determine the necessary movement patterns based off wall distance data from an infrared sensor.
  • System 5: This system should navigate the course without much effort as well, as the system uses a wall following lever to turn based upon the wall location.
  • System 6: This system would probably not navigate the course effectively, as the system depends on random binary selection of movement selection.  Thus, it is not necessarily guaranteed that the system wouldn’t turn around and move in the opposite direction while moving through the course.

Build Time

  • System 1: This system can probably be built within the time 30 hours or so of time allowed to us, as all parts are readily available, the construction is rather simple, and programming should be simple as well.
  • System 2: This system can also probably be built within the 30 hours or so , for the same reasons as before, so long as the capacitor needed is assumed possible to be able to find.
  • System 3: This system is like system 1 and can thus also be assumed possible to build within the 30 hours for the same reasons.
  • System 4: This system differs mostly from systems 1 and 3 from the use of a pulley system, which can be executed by simple means, and thus can also be assumed to be buildable within 30 hours.
  • System 5: This system, while not using many off-the-shelf parts, is simple in that it is purely mechanical and does not contain many parts, so it can probably be built in the 30 hours of time available.
  • System 6: This system also uses off-the-shelf parts, so it should be buildable within 30 hours, assuming the parts can be found.

Number of Laps

  • System 1: This system would more than likely be able to complete at least 2 laps, as it uses technology which has been well tested and proven to work.
  • System 2: This system may not complete 2 full laps, as the amount of energy storage is severely limited by the capacitors available to us that will fit this purpose.
  • System 3: This system would also more than likely be able to complete at least 2 laps, as it uses technology which has been well tested and proven to work.
  • System 4: This system would also more than likely be able to complete at least 2 laps, as it uses technology which has been well tested and proven to work.
  • System 5: This system may not be able to complete 2 full laps, as the amount of energy that can be stored is limited by the gear reduction system and the physical height that the weights can be lifted.
  • System 6: This system would more than likely not be able to complete 2 full laps, as the system is highly inefficient and most of the energy would be lost through friction, heat, or leaks in the air system.  Further, the kite would lose effectiveness in pulling the string the further it gets away from the fan.

Reliable

  • System 1: This system uses technology which has been well tested and proven to work, and thus probably be reliable so long as our coding is not buggy.
  • System 2: This system also uses technology which has been well tested and proven to work, and thus probably be reliable so long as our coding is not buggy.
  • System 3: This system also uses technology which has been well tested and proven to work, and thus probably be reliable so long as our coding is not buggy
  • System 4: This system uses pulleys, which can result in slipping, sliding, or removal of the belts under high-stress situations, which can be unreliable.
  • System 5: This system also uses pulleys, as well as mechanical components under continuous high stress, which can be unreliable as they can break or slip.
  • System 6: This system uses a kite, which is difficult to control, as well as a compressed air system, which can leak, seize, or break, meaning this system has many failure modes, probably making it unreliable.

Components Have Complementary Functions

  • System 1: The idea of this system was generated with the idea of proper functioning in mind, and thus the system should possess parts which work together as a whole.
  • System 2: The idea of this system was generated with the idea of proper functioning in mind, and thus the system should possess parts which work together as a whole.
  • System 3: The idea of this system was generated with the idea of proper functioning in mind, and thus the system should possess parts which work together as a whole.
  • System 4: The idea of this system was generated with the idea of proper functioning in mind, and thus the system should possess parts which work together as a whole.
  • System 5: The idea of this system was generated with the idea of proper functioning in mind, and thus the system should possess parts which work together as a whole.
  • System 6: The idea of this system was generated with the idea of proper functioning in mind, and thus the system should possess parts which work together as a whole.

Cost

  • System 1: Motors (~$3 each), sonar sensor (~$0.42), control board (~$10), batteries (~$10), and the like for this system seem cheap and readily available.
  • System 2: Motors (~$3 each), infrared sensor (~$0.15), control boards (~$10), and the like for this system seem cheap and readily available, but a substantial enough capacitor (found one for $395) might be too expensive.
  • System 3: As far as we can tell, motors (~$3 each), infrared sensor (~$0.15), control boards (~$10), and the like for this system are cheap and readily available.
  • System 4: As far as we can tell, motors (~$3 each), infrared sensor (~$0.15), control boards (~$10), and the like for this system are cheap and readily available.
  • System 5: This system operating completely mechanically seems to make the parts extremely cheap, as raw materials like wood can be had from scrap (free).
  • System 6: The compressor (~$20), a small air engine (~$40), and a pressure vessel (~$40) would add substantial cost to the device, which may bring the system over budget.

Stores Wind Energy Efficiently

  • System 1: This system should be able to store more than 30% of the wind energy, as the transfer of energy through electrical systems can be some of the most efficient energy transfers.
  • System 2: This system should be able to store more than 30% of the wind energy, as the transfer of energy through electrical systems can be some of the most efficient energy transfers.
  • System 3: This system should be able to store more than 30% of the wind energy, as the transfer of energy through electrical systems can be some of the most efficient energy transfers.
  • System 4: This system should be able to store more than 30% of the wind energy, as the transfer of energy through electrical systems can be some of the most efficient energy transfers.
  • System 5: This system would probably not be able to store more than 30% of the wind energy, as the energy transfer losses between the gearing and pulley systems for the weights would be rather high due to friction through every stage of the system.
  • System 6: This system would probably not be able to store more than 30% of the wind energy, as a kite is a poor means of utilizing wind energy, the compressor would lose large amounts of energy due to friction and heat through compression, the system could easily leak pressurized air, and the engine would have a high friction component as well.

Standardized Parts

  • System 1: This system should use standardized parts, as the design would be most easily constructed and assembled using similar fasteners and the like, and thus will be easy to swap parts or rebuild without much thought.
  • System 2: This system should use standardized parts, as the design would be most easily constructed and assembled using similar fasteners and the like, and thus will be easy to swap parts or rebuild without much thought.
  • System 3: This system should use standardized parts, as the design would be most easily constructed and assembled using similar fasteners and the like, and thus will be easy to swap parts or rebuild without much thought.
  • System 4: This system should use standardized parts, as the design would be most easily constructed and assembled using similar fasteners and the like, and thus will be easy to swap parts or rebuild without much thought.
  • System 5: This system should use standardized parts, as the design would be most easily constructed and assembled using similar fasteners and the like, and thus will be easy to swap parts or rebuild without much thought.
  • System 6: This system should use standardized parts, as the design would be most easily constructed and assembled using similar fasteners and the like, and thus will be easy to swap parts or rebuild without much thought.

Weight

  • System 1: This system should not weigh more than 5kg, as the parts required to construct the system are not large (motors, battery, generator, sonar sensor), and the materials that the body is constructed from can be lightweight.
  • System 2: This system also should not weigh more than 5kg, as the parts required to construct the system (motors, capacitor, alternator, infrared sensor) are not large, and the materials that the body is constructed from can be lightweight.
  • System 3: This system also should not weigh more than 5kg, as the parts required to construct the system (motors, battery, alternator, infrared sensor) are not large, and the materials that the body is constructed from can be lightweight.
  • System 4: This system also should not weigh more than 5kg, as the parts required to construct the system (motors, battery, generator, infrared sensor) are not large, and the materials that the body is constructed from can be lightweight.
  • System 5: This system also should not weigh more than 5kg, as the material that the entirety of the body and system construction could be of a lightweight, yet strong material.  The use of metals is not even necessary in this case.
  • System 6: This system would more than likely weigh more than 5kg, as the compressor, engine, and pressure vessel would necessarily be made of metal, as that is what is available, making the assembly quite massive.

Payload

  • System 1: This system should be able to carry a payload without failing to complete 2 laps, as there is ample storage room in the battery for the energy gathered during the wind collection phase.  Further, rolling friction doesn’t increase much with increased mass.
  • System 2: This system would probably not be able to carry a payload without failing to complete 2 laps, as the capacitor would have much less storage room than that of a battery and would probably drain before 2 laps were completed.  Further, the pulley system might slip under the increased load.
  • System 3: This system should be able to carry a payload without failing to complete 2 laps, as there is ample storage room in the battery for the energy gathered during the wind collection phase.  Further, rolling friction doesn’t increase much with increased mass.
  • System 4: Though this system could store enough energy during the wind collection phase, the use of pulleys would probably lead to belt slippage with increased weight during operation, which could waste enough energy for the system to not complete 2 laps.
  • System 5: This system should be able to store enough energy during the wind collection phase to power the vehicle.  Also, the weight of the payload would be an advantage in that it could provide more potential energy to the system if added to the suspended mass that powers the system.
  • System 6: This system would probably not be able to complete 2 laps, as the motion of the vehicle is directly proportional to the pressure stored in the pressure vessel.  With the same pressure stored, the system has less ability to move a higher weight as it requires more force.

Pranav Mohan

Change and progress are two words that define my character and my ultimate goals. I have a vision to bring a global change by targeting the psychology, because that is the easiest to change. My aim is to incur a self-progressive routine for myself and then help the people around me to progress themselves. In my perspective, walking towards a defined target should be everyone’s goal while keeping in mind that things don’t go as planned but still the target should remain unchanged.


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